Roped Access: Reaching the Parts Others Can't

Author: Fewtrell, Andy

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Roped Access: Reaching the Parts Others Can't

The Structural Engineer
Roped Access: Reaching the Parts Others Can't
Date published

N/A

Author

Fewtrell, Andy

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Fewtrell, Andy

People swinging from ropes has again become a common site in London. They are not unsuccessful members of the criminal community, but engineers, surveyors, painters, and glaziers. Industrial roped access techniques are now clearly recognised as useful
tools in the construction industry.

Andy Fewtrell

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Feature Issue 22

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