Enhancements to the Resisting Moment of Unreinforced Masonry Walls Due to Shifts in the Neutral Axis

Author: Fried, A N

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Enhancements to the Resisting Moment of Unreinforced Masonry Walls Due to Shifts in the Neutral Axis

The Structural Engineer
Enhancements to the Resisting Moment of Unreinforced Masonry Walls Due to Shifts in the Neutral Axis
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Fried, A N

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Masonry is one of man's oldest building materials, its use stretching back for thousands of years. In about 2200 BC, when the Tower of Babel was being constructed, the writer informs us that the builders used brick instead of stone and tar instead of mortar, from which it is evident that masonry construction using stone and mortar was already well established as a building technique at that time. Since these ancient times, the basic principles of masonry construction have hardly altered, although there have been changes to the building and production processes and to the philosophy of masonry construction. A.N. Fried

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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