City of Dreams, Macau – making the vision viable

Author: E. Piermarini (BuroHappold Hong Kong), H. Nuttall (BuroHappold Hong Kong), R. May (BuroHappold Bath) and V. M. Janssens (BuroHappold Hong Kong)

Date published

1 March 2016

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City of Dreams, Macau – making the vision viable

The Structural Engineer
City of Dreams, Macau – making the vision viable
Date published

1 March 2016

Author

E. Piermarini (BuroHappold Hong Kong), H. Nuttall (BuroHappold Hong Kong), R. May (BuroHappold Bath) and V. M. Janssens (BuroHappold Hong Kong)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Online purchases unavailable

Unfortunately we are unable to process online purchases at this time.

Find out more

Author

E. Piermarini (BuroHappold Hong Kong), H. Nuttall (BuroHappold Hong Kong), R. May (BuroHappold Bath) and V. M. Janssens (BuroHappold Hong Kong)

This article describes how cutting edge parametric-based engineering techniques have been used to achieve the detailed design of 2500 complex steelwork connections for the exoskeleton of the new City of Dreams hotel in Macau, China. It discusses the tools, methodology and strategy employed by the engineering team to automate the difficult and time-consuming process of creating, verifying and documenting the geometrically challenging, large-scale steel connections using finite element methods within an ambitious timescale of just 12 months.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
12
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Project Focus Issue 3

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