Foreword

Author: C. Sexton (Crossrail Ltd)

Date published

2 July 2018

First published: 2 July 2018

Price
Free
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The Structural Engineer
Foreword
Date published

2 July 2018

Author

C. Sexton (Crossrail Ltd)

Price

Free

First published

2 July 2018

Access Resource
Author

C. Sexton (Crossrail Ltd)

I am pleased to have been asked to contribute a foreword to this timely publication. As work on the Crossrail programme comes to a conclusion and we pass the baton of largest infrastructure project in Europe to High Speed 2, this is a valuable collection of insights into the design and construction process for the structural elements of the programme. Crossrail has always been committed to sharing lessons learned, embodied most effectively in our Learning Legacy initiative, through which we have published many examples of insight and good practice on a dedicated website.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
1
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 7

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