Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 24): Principles of the design of post-fixed anchors

Author: Chris O'Regan

Date published

3 February 2020

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Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 24): Principles of the design of post-fixed anchors

The Structural Engineer
Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 24): Principles of the design of post-fixed anchors
Date published

3 February 2020

Author

Chris O'Regan

Price

Standard: £9
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Chris O'Regan

Post-fixed anchors have been used in one form or another for over 100 years. They are typically needed in refurbishments, or in new-build projects where cast-in fixings are not practical or a late change has occurred.

Designing a post-fixed anchor can be a convoluted process, principally due to the number of variables involved when considering its use in any given situation. The anchor itself could be resin-based or mechanical, with this choice guided by the material it is to be fixed into and the required loads.

Technical Guidance Note Level 1, No. 29 Post-fix anchors provides an introduction to these fixings, and readers of this note should ensure they are familiar with the concepts discussed.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
3
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Technical Guidance Notes (Level 2) Technical Issue 2

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