Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 25): Designing for torsion in reinforced concrete elements

Author: Chris O'Regan

Date published

1 April 2020

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Standard: £9
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Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 25): Designing for torsion in reinforced concrete elements

The Structural Engineer
Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 25): Designing for torsion in reinforced concrete elements
Date published

1 April 2020

Author

Chris O'Regan

Price

Standard: £9
Members/Subscribers: Free
 

Buy Now
Author

Chris O'Regan

Reinforced concrete elements have an inherent resistance to applied torque due to the geometry of their cross-section. Nevertheless, the resulting stress due to applied torque is additive to other actions, such as bending moments, and axial and shear forces.

This Technical Guidance Note discusses the impact torsion has on the design and detailing of reinforced concrete elements. It should be read in conjunction with Level 1, No. 21 How to avoid torsion.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
4
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Concrete - reinforced Shear & Torsion Technical Guidance Notes (Level 2) Technical Issue 4

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