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The Structural Engineer

The above title has been assumed for this paper because it is the title of a book on the same subject and because it is very appropriate, since the author's object is the increased commercial prosperity of the Empire. Before any more is said the author desires to define his position. E. A. W. Phillips

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

The regulations relating to the use of reinforced concrete in building construction, recently issued by the London County Council, are the first of any importance in this country and will doubtless be used as a basis for similar regulations throughout the Provinces. Charles F. Marsh

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

The PRESIDENT: "It is something of a departure to have a paper on the subject that has been dealt with by Mr. Peers. Whilst, however, it might be a little out of the rut of their usual papers the departure had been a successful one. In all departments of life there was a great deal to be learned from history and their own particular department was no exception. They were very much obliged to the author for telling them of the interesting work he had done."

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

With reference to some of the Papers read during the Session, 1916-17.

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

On May 31st, 1918, the Institute had 824 Members, 75 Associate-Members, 13 Associates; 56 Students, 4 Special Subscribers and 9 Honorary Members.

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Four years ago reinforced concrete was hardly known, and certainly not understood, by many people outside the comparatively few architects and engineers who had studied and practised in this material. A. Alban H. Scott

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

The present Membership of the Concrete Institute and alteration since the previous figures were given for the 1915-16 Session are shown in the following table:-

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

The present Membership of the Concrete Institute and its alteration since the previous figures were given for the 1916-17 Session are shewn in the following table:-

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

THE SEVENTY-SIXTH ORDINARY GENERAL MEETING of the CONCRETE INSTITUTE was held at Denison House, 296, Vauxhall Bridge Road, Westminster, London, S.W., on Thursday, December 2oth, 1917, at 5.30 p.m.

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Having been asked to write something on the use of partitions, I had almost thought their common use and infinite variety would scarcely have required anyone to ask further information on the question, a matter of some difficulty owing to the simplicity of construction. H. L. Barraclough

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

The scope of this paper does not permit the inclusion of a review of the growth of business in frozen or chilled produce as facilities in carriage and cold storage developed, nor yet an exposition of the advantages of cold storage in enabling perishable produce to be transported from great distances and through tropical temperatures, whilst at the same time preserving it in a condition for distribution to and consumption by the public. But a few brief words on the subject of cold storage in the Port during the early days may not be amiss as introductory to the principal subject of the paper. H. J. Deane

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Owing to the unprecedented importance of iron in its relation to modern civilisation the early history of the metal possesses peculiar fascination for the antiquary. It is safe to assert that the wonderful progress which has marked our path during the last 1OO years would not have been possible had not the earth possessed an abundant supply of iron ore. In whichever direction we cast our eyes, articles of iron, large and small, essential and ornamental, meet our gaze. It is iron in some form or other that constitutes the backbone both of our railways and of our mercantile marine. Without these rapid means of transport the huge populations of London and our larger cities could not be fed and supplied with the necessaries of civilised life as we know it today. Again, reinforced concrete, in which we are all specially interested, owes what strength and adaptability it possesses almost entirely to its iron frame. I am sufficiently optimistic to believe that a brilliant future is already assured for this material. J. Newton Friend

Publish Date - 1st April 1921

Author – N/A

Price – £9