The Constructional Aspect of Large Electricity Generating Stations

Author: Dean, Arthur Creswell

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The Constructional Aspect of Large Electricity Generating Stations

The Structural Engineer
The Constructional Aspect of Large Electricity Generating Stations
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Dean, Arthur Creswell

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The constructional side of large electricity generating stations is a subject which has perhaps not received the consideration it deserves. This appears somewhat surprising when it is realised that the cost of the building works only of a large modern power station, excluding coal and ash handling facilities, condensing water system, and external subsidiaries, may be a proportion of the order of some 20 per cent. to 25 per cent. of the total cost of the station completely equipped with plant. Arthur Creswell Dean

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 2

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