Correspondence. Stress Analysis of Modern Structural Frames
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Correspondence. Stress Analysis of Modern Structural Frames

The Structural Engineer
Correspondence. Stress Analysis of Modern Structural Frames
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

SIR,In the recent paper entitled “Stress Analysis of Modern Structural Frames,” as reported in the September issue of The Structural Engineer, Mr. J.B.M. Hay is to be congratulated upon bringing up the question of the direct design of indeterminate structures. Most engineers are familiar with the difficulties of mathematical analysis, some of which Mr. Hay pointed out, but rarely is there an exposition of a method of direct design such as that given in the first paragraph of page 392.

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Opinion Issue 10

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