New Westminster Hopsital. Discussion on Mr. R. Travers Morgan’S Paper.
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New Westminster Hopsital. Discussion on Mr. R. Travers Morgan’S Paper.

The Structural Engineer
New Westminster Hopsital. Discussion on Mr. R. Travers Morgan’S Paper.
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THE PRESIDENT (Professor J. Husband, F.R.C.Sc.I., M.Inst.C.E.) extended a hearty welcome to the President and members of the British Section of the Societe des Ingenieurs Civils de France, and said that his pleasure in so doing was rendered all the greater by reason of the fact that he had been a member of that body for 34 years.

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Opinion Issue 3

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