Housing: the essential factors in the provision of workmen's houses

Author: Ruthen, Sir Charles T

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Housing: the essential factors in the provision of workmen's houses

The Structural Engineer
Housing: the essential factors in the provision of workmen's houses
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Ruthen, Sir Charles T

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The essential factors that I have in mind for the purpose of this short article are labour and materials. There are others, including that of need. Space will not, however, permit oi my dealing with this aspect of the question, although I would summarise the views that I have previously and more definitely expressed with reference to it by saying that the need is very great indeed; and although variously estimated there can be no doubt that it is limited in practice only by the availability of our resources in labour, material and finance. Sir Charles T. Ruthen

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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