The Institution of Structural Engineers. A Monograph by the President
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The Institution of Structural Engineers. A Monograph by the President

The Structural Engineer
The Institution of Structural Engineers. A Monograph by the President
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

This issue of THE STRUCTURAL ENGINEER contains my Presidential Address to The Institution of Structural Engineers. As the reader may or may not have discovered, I took as my text the History of the Invention and Development of Portland Cement, this year being the Centenary of the invention of that cement, which has had so large an influence on the profession af Structural Engineering. Having taken a text, I had, more or less, to confine myself to a discourse upon it, and the result was that I was left with no space or time in which to dilate upon the aims, activities and engagements of the Institution of which I have the hanour to be President. I will now endeavour to give an account of my Stewardship as far as it has gone, and to foreshadow what I hope will be done during the remainder of my period of office.

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