Methods of Computing Moments in Reinforced Building Frames

Author: Stokes, G W

Date published

N/A

First published: N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Added to basket

Back to Previous

Methods of Computing Moments in Reinforced Building Frames

The Structural Engineer
Methods of Computing Moments in Reinforced Building Frames
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Stokes, G W

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

THESE notes and diagrams have been prepared with the following limited objects. Firstly, to compare the moments in beams and columns which result from the application of the three methods of computation sanctioned in the L.C.C. Memorandum (1938) as revised in 1939 (Clauses 12 and 19), and to express these methods in the form of diagrams. Secondly, to compare alternative methods of calculating end moments in beams and colmumns for a monolithic frame (Clause 12, Section (i)) and thirdly to shew approximately the effect on beam and column moments of some secondary factors which are usually ignored. G.W. Stokes

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 7

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
Correspondence. Discussion on the Paper by Dr. W.T. Marshall and Mr. R.N. Tembe Experiments on Plain

Correspondence. Discussion on the Paper by Dr. W.T. Marshall and Mr. R.N. Tembe Experiments on Plain

As in the Author’s Reply (“Structural Engineer,” May 1942), it is stated they are interested in my answering certain questions submitted. I am pleased to give these as under: (1) The value of 800 lbs./sq. in. for the shear stress obtained by Freyssinet in an unreinforced specimen is certainly high. Freyssinet applied for the manufacture of these very small specimens the application of his process of vibration, compression (by hydraulic pressure) and heating in strong tubular moulds. (This compression applied for manufacturing the specimen is not to be confused with the precompression applied on a part of the specimen by pre-stressing of the reinforcement).

Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
The Lifting of the Bottom of a Circular Steel Tank

The Lifting of the Bottom of a Circular Steel Tank

1. INTRODUCTION. EXPERIENCE shows that, under two types of loading, the circular bottom of a large cylindrical steel tank may partially lift off the concrete base on which the tank rests, leaving a central area lying flat on the base. The first of these, indicated in Fig. 1 and examined in section 2, occurs when the tank is filled with fuel or water. The hydrostatic pressure on the shell causes a bending moment along the circumference of the bottom which tends to lift the bottom. The second is found when a tank is used for the storage of volatile spirit. To prevent excessive loss by evaporation the vents in the roof are loaded so that a small vapour pressure is maintained in the tank. Although this pressure is usually only a few pounds per square inch, yet it acts on such a large area of roof that the shell is put in vertical tension. The pressure persists when the tank is emptied, and then the edge of the bottom tends to lift as shown in Fig. 4, the disturbance caused by the shell being due partly to the bending moment as in the first case and partly to the upward force. The behaviour of the shell and the bottom with uniform pressure in the tank is therefore considered in section 3. The procedure in each case will be to calculate the relation between the bending moment M., and the rotation è (Figs. 1 and 4) first for the bottom and then for the shell. Hence the absolute magnitudes of these quantities can be obtained. When this has been done, the usual methods suffice to determine the deflexions and stresses throughout both the bottom and the shell. A.M. Binnie

Author - Binnie, A M
Price - £9