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The Structural Engineer

It is thought that the following data, which can be used as an alternative to the more usual tabulated method of analysis for the solution of this class of frame, might be of interest, particularly to the junior member. The simple form of integration used will be explained in detail, therefore, knowledge of the calculus is not required. Certain assumptions are made, and these will be noted. The example chosen to illustrate the method is shown in Fig. 1. Principals of portal frame design will be taken as read. The thod is applicable to frames generally of the type indicated which have members of constant moment of inertia. In the frame under discussion, one equation of elasticity is required to find the magnitude of true horizontal thrusts. The equation, which is quite well known, will be repeated for reference. It is:- A. Harker

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The Structural Engineer

An Ordinary Meeting of the Institution of Structural Engineers was held at 11, Upper Belgrave Street, London, S.W.1, on Thursday, March 2nd, 1944.

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The Structural Engineer

BEFORE we can discuss the design of the Coal Staith and, for the benefit of those who are not familiar with Power Station layout, some idea must be given of the method employed to keep the Station supplied with the necessary fuel. G.M. Frost

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The Structural Engineer

Extracts from the Presidential Address to the Institution of Highway Engineers given at Leicester on 2lst April, 1944. When Julius Caesar made a landing in this country, it was only in the nature of a commando raid, and it was not until the victories of Julius Agricola, from A.D. 78 to 84, carried the Roman frontier to the Firths of Forth and Clyde that the work of Roman civilisation followed. The population was grouped in cities such as York and Lincoln, which were governed by their own municipal officers, guarded by massive walls and linked together by a network ofroads, which extended from one end of the island to the other. These roads were built as military highways, to keep a conquered people in subjection ; but later a certain amount of commerce came into being, and agricultural produce, tin from the mines of Cornwall, lead from the mines of Somerset and Northumberland, and iron from the mines of the Forest of Dean, were exported to supply the necessities of Gaul. Town and country were all crushed by taxation and the mines were worked by forced labour. George McLean Gibson

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The Structural Engineer

". . . as to the knowledge that they (i.e. relaxation methods) presume, the answer is that we have regarded no problem as solved until, for the actual computations, no more than the first four rules of arithmetic is required. What is of greater importance, even though a computer may not comprehend the theoretical basis of his calculations he will have, throughout, a mental picture of what he is doing; he will see his task as that of bringing unaccounted or 'residual' quantities within a specified margin of uncertainty. Whether regarded philosophically or practically, this is the essential feature by which the new mathematics differs from the old; it is 'mathematics with a fringe.'" PROFESSOR R. V. SOUTHWELL (Ref. 7)

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