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The Structural Engineer

A brief introduction states the proportion between structure and total building cost and considers the effect of ancillary buildings on hangar design. A description is then given of aluminium as a structural material followed by a detailed account of the design of a 200 ft. span aluminium hangar. Unusual features of three other types of aluminium hangar are then given. Tubular steel as a structural medium is discussed and illustrated by a description of a 150 ft. two way span tubular steel hangar. Conclusions are stated and a bibliography given. L.E. Ward

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Author – Ward, L E

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The Structural Engineer

The Institution welcomes as President for the Session 1958-1959 Mr. G. S. McDonald, M.I.Struct.E., M.I.C.E., M.I.Mun.E., who takes office on the 2nd October.

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The Structural Engineer

The structural industry was one of the early users of electric arc welding and there are many examples which date back to the 1920’s. Its use increased steadily until the Second World War, but it was during the war and in this post war period that the greatest increase in its application has taken place. It has now become one of the leading methods of fabrication and welded work, as a percentage of the total structural production in this country, rivals all other methods. Indeed, in many structural fields, for example rigid frames and structures designed by the plastic theory, it is now the only method of fabrication in use. J.S. Allen

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Author – Allen, J S

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The Structural Engineer

Introduction The expression a p - S = U is used in a method of calculating the equilibrium moisture distribution in soils, where a = a compressibility factor; S = the suction characteristic of the soil; U = the pore water pressure relative to the position of the water-table;and P = the pressure due to the overburden above the zone under consideration. The value p can also include any surface loading n due to a road, runway, or light structure, i.e., p = h Dw, + n, where h = depth from the surface to the centre of the zone: Dw = Dd (100 + m)/ 100 = bulk density of the soil,and Dd is the dry density: m = a value of moisture content assumed as a first approximation (this may be adjusted when the equilibrium moisture contents have been estimated once, by choosing the new value of m to give a better estimate of Dw). E. LL. Morgan

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Author – Morgan, E L

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