Bridges
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The Structural Engineer
Bridges
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

FIFTY YEARS takes us back to 1908. During those fifty years very notable progress has been made in all civilized countries in the science and art of bridge construction. All bridge structures belong to one or other of the three fundamental types, the suspension bridge, arch and the supported girder. Although at the present time these three primary types have become sub-divided into a large number of variations conforming to special requirements dictated by topography of site, character and exigencies of traffic, properties of materials and possible methods of erection, yet such variants are the outcome of a gradual evolution dating back to prehistoric times. Professor Emeritus Joseph Husband

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 13

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