Clay Products and Brickwork
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Clay Products and Brickwork

The Structural Engineer
Clay Products and Brickwork
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

IN BRITAIN, clay products and brickwork are among the last materials that the structural engineer would expect to provide exciting news of technical innovations in his field. Brickwork has been the builder’s tried friend for many centuries, on the basis of all-round merits that are not combined to the same degree in any other material, and we tend to assume that our close friends could never surprise us. The structural possibilities of brickwork have been accurately defined in the present century by research into the relation between the strength of brick piers and walls and that of the bricks and mortar used in their construction. The Building Research Station’s work in this field has dealt almost exclusively with the properties of brickwork built with solid bricks of standard size because few bricks of any other type are made in Britain. B. Butterworth

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 13

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