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The Institution Awards

The Structural Engineer
The Institution Awards
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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THERE IS A sense in which it may be said that the virility of a scientific society can be measured by the extent and number of the awards and prizes which it offers. Competition is the very essence of progress and competition is measured satisfactorily by the award of prizes of varying kinds. F.R. Bullen

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 13

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