Some Aspects of Structural Vibration

Author: Digby, W P

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Some Aspects of Structural Vibration

The Structural Engineer
Some Aspects of Structural Vibration
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Digby, W P

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Introductory. The author submits this paper to the Institution with some trepidation, on account of the fact that he has no credentials of architectural knowledge or tuition which could entitle him to speak to a gathering of structural engineers. His professional training and experience have been that of an engineer yet the alleged faults of his own and other branches of engineering development have on many occasions during the past twelve years led him to take records of the amplitude of vibration resulting from various causes in a large number of buildings, and to study the accompanying phenomena. Each such study has on completion been duly pigeon-holed and its lessons remembered. No two were identical. In many cases remedial measures were necessary; in a few legal authorities were also concerned; in others the measurements were found to indicate such slight movements that the matter dropped. The writer feels, however, that omitting cases occurring within the last 2 1/2 years and suppressing the names of places whlch might possibly lead to the identification of any of the several earlier cases quoted, he is now entitled to submit a selection of the more interesting of these to professional colleagues who may be concerned with ills which in their manifestation are modern in their origin, and are likely to increase in extent in the next few years. W.P. Digby

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Issue 11

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