Concrete Roads in America, and the Application of their Principles of Design and Construction to Gre

Author: Smith, R A B

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Concrete Roads in America, and the Application of their Principles of Design and Construction to Gre


The Structural Engineer
Concrete Roads in America, and the Application of their Principles of Design and Construction to Gre
Date published

N/A

Author

Smith, R A B

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now
Author

Smith, R A B

Thc first stretch of street paving in concrete was laid down in Bellefontaine, Ohio, thirtythree years ago by Mr. Snyder, a contractor, who was called in to make a crossing that would stand up to heavy loads of lumber and the hoofs of horses then used to haul the waggons and drays. This crossing constructed for the lumber company is still in use. Major R.A.B. Smith

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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