Experiments and Transformations. Chapter III

Author: Edwards, A Trystan

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Experiments and Transformations. Chapter III

The Structural Engineer
Experiments and Transformations. Chapter III
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Edwards, A Trystan

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The progress of design, in architecture and engineering or in anything else, can only proceed by experiment, and the more logical the experiment the more rapid is this progress. Nor is it in the least necessary that these experiments should assume the form of actual building. It would be a poor compliment to men’s imagination if it must needs be assumed that we must build in order to experiment in design. One of the principal functions of pictorial representation is to promote the art of design by enabling us to visualise in plan, prospective or elevation such forms and patterns as the creative fancy may suggest. It is the peculiarity of reason that it not only curbs the creative fancy, bringing it within proper bounds, but it may also immensely stimulate this fancy. A. Trystan Edwards Starting with the aesthetic canon of “ punctuat

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