Shear Strength of Reinforced Brickwork Beams. influence of Shear Arm Ratio and Amount of Tensile Ste

Author: Suter, G T;Hendry, A W

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Shear Strength of Reinforced Brickwork Beams. influence of Shear Arm Ratio and Amount of Tensile Ste


The Structural Engineer
Shear Strength of Reinforced Brickwork Beams. influence of Shear Arm Ratio and Amount of Tensile Ste
Date published

N/A

Author

Suter, G T;Hendry, A W

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now
Author

Suter, G T;Hendry, A W

Soon British reinforced brickwork design will shift from a permissible stress approach to a limit state approach similar to that already accomplished for reinforced concrete. For the limit state shear design of reinforced brickwork beams, ultimate shear stress values must be defined as a function of the main shear parameters. The main parameters, similar to the case of reinforced concrete beams, were assumed to be the ratio of shear span to effective depth a/d, and the percentage of tensile reinforcement p. Since a review of published evidence provided little systematic data on the influence of a/d and p on reinforced brickwork strength, the authors carried out a systematic experimental investigation involving a/d and p. Results indicate a significant increase in ultimate shear stress with decreasing a/d values similar to the case of reinforced concrete beams, but, in contrast to the case of reinforced concrete beams, a virtual independence of p on ultimate shear stress. G.T. Suter and A.W. Hendry

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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