The Strength of Straightened Welded Steel Stiffened Plates

Author: Horne, M R;Narayanan, R

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The Strength of Straightened Welded Steel Stiffened Plates

The Structural Engineer
The Strength of Straightened Welded Steel Stiffened Plates
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Horne, M R;Narayanan, R

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Various means are commonly used to rectify lack of straightness in stiffened steel panels to bring them within working tolerances such as those stipulated in the Merrison Rules for box girders. The paper describes tests to establish whether panels straightened by various heating, jigging and over-loading procedures have the same strength as panels fabricated to meet those tolerances without resort to such procedures. The panel proportions and modes of testing were designed to produce in all cases collapse by failure of the outstand. It was found that, while straightening procedures which caused compressive residual stresses in the outstand left the panel with a decreased capacity in compression, procedures which left a tensile residual stress could restore the full carrying capacity. M.R. Horne and R. Narayanan

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 11

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