Maitland Lecture 1980
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Maitland Lecture 1980

The Structural Engineer
Maitland Lecture 1980
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Some 400 members and their guests heard Professor Eric Laithwaite give the 1980 Maitland Lecture (for text see page 5) in London on 13 November last. Institution guests for the evening included Lord Kings Norton, Lord and Lady Miles, Sir Frank and Lady Mason, as well as Dr. Oleg Kerensky (1st Maitland Lecturer, 1959) and Mrs Kerensky, and Sir Ove Arup (Maitland Lecturer 1968) with Lady Amp.

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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