Added to basket

Contents page

The Structural Engineer

Mr W. E. A. Skinner (F): I am particularly interested in tall buildings in Hong Kong, as the practice of which I am a member has been responsible for a number of such buildings and Hong Kong remains one of the few parts of the world where one can practice the art of building tall. Indeed, prior to the completion of the Hopewell Centre, our Connaught Centre was the tallest building in the colony. It is now dwarfed by the new edifice. It would perhaps be appropriate to make a few comparisons between the two buildings.

Publish Date - N/A

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Dr. E. C. Harnbly (M): I suggested that the Institution should hold this colloquium because it seemed to me that we are becoming increasingly preoccupied with regulations and Codes relating to what has happened in the past and need to speculate about which way we are going, even if we feel that we are making very little headway at the time.

Publish Date - N/A

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Steel chimneys have been known to be subject to wind-induced oscillation. As a design procedure, an investigation was carried out on the aerodynamic oscillatory behaviour of the proposed Edinburgh Royal Infirmary boilerhouse stack through wind tunnel tests on models fitted with various types of aerodynamic damping device. When the new stack was erected, with the incorporation of a damping device consisting of a system of longitudinal slats, instrumental observation on the behaviour of the complete structure in wind was also carried out in situ. H.Y. Wong and D. Dick

Publish Date - N/A

Author – N/A

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Closed-type links for torsion Here is an interesting question posed by Mr L. Wadsworth: Clause 3.3.7 of CPllO requires that ‘closed-type links similar to bending code 74 of BS4466 should be used to resist torsion, presumably in preference to an ordinary code 60 link which, of course, is normally employed to resist shear. My query is-why? What is it about torsion on a concrete beam that requires the use of a code 74 instead of a code 60 link? To my simple mind, the leg of a link is a simple filament, only capable of carrying tension; how does it know whether this tension arises from shear, torsion, or indeed anything else? Conversely, if a code 60 link is for some reason unable to resist the tension induced by a twist of the section, how then is it able to carry safely the tension induced by a shear force? Verulam

Publish Date - N/A

Author – N/A

Price – £9