The Romance of Silica

Author: Sargeant, E F

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The Romance of Silica

The Structural Engineer
The Romance of Silica
Date published

N/A

Author

Sargeant, E F

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Sargeant, E F

Silica forms 60 per cent. by weight of the earth’s crust, and as the Great Architect of
the Universe has chosen silica for the frame of this earth, so the structural engineer, in his infinitely humbler capacity, uses it to form about 60 to 70 per cent. of the weight of concrete.

E.F. Sargeant

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 6

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