Charter-Anniversary Issue. Structures at the Heart of the Nation

Author: Tietz, S B;Waller, J A

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Charter-Anniversary Issue. Structures at the Heart of the Nation

The Structural Engineer
Charter-Anniversary Issue. Structures at the Heart of the Nation
Date published

N/A

Author

Tietz, S B;Waller, J A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Tietz, S B;Waller, J A

The great structures I shall be discussing have been largely the works of famous engineers, but the first and most popular of all was the work of a gardener's boy on the Duke of Devonshire's estate. The Great Exhibition of 1851, inspired by the Prince Consort, was housed in the Crystal Palace in Hyde Park. This was a huge conservatory designed by Joseph Paxton, and based on an earlier one he had built at Chatsworth for the Duke of Devonshire. The Crystal Palace was 1850 ft long (three times the length of St Paul's Cathedral) and, after being opened by Queen Victoria in 1854, was visited by 6 M people in the next 24 weeks! It was then transferred to a fine site on a hill at Sydenham in south London, where it remained in good use until it was destroyed by fire in 1936. Thus was created and lost a fairy palace for the people. Professor Sir Alfred Pugsley

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 9

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