Verification of the Robustness of a Six-Storey Timber-Frame Building

Author: Milner, M W;Edwards, S;Turnbull, D B;Enjily, V

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Verification of the Robustness of a Six-Storey Timber-Frame Building


The Structural Engineer
Verification of the Robustness of a Six-Storey Timber-Frame Building
Date published

N/A

Author

Milner, M W;Edwards, S;Turnbull, D B;Enjily, V

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now
Author

Milner, M W;Edwards, S;Turnbull, D B;Enjily, V

Robustness tests have been undertaken on a full-scale six-storey timber frame test building. The building, known as TF2000, is the result of a DETR-supported and industry-funded research project. The core research programme includes full-scale tests to enable an evaluation of the actual behaviour of the TF2000 structure when selected vertical loadbearing wall panels are removed. This evaluation was to verify by ‘test’ that the inherent stiffness of standard cellular platform timber frame construction can provide adequate robustness so that, in the event of an accident or misuse, the building will not suffer collapse to an extent disproportionate to the cause. This is referred to as disproportionate collapse compliance within the UK Building Regulations. M.W. Milner, S. Edwards, D.B. Turnbull and V. Enjily

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 16

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