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The Structural Engineer

Dr S. B. Desai (F) (DETR) I wish to thank the author for bringing forward some important issues on loading on buildings through his paper and for discussion at a forum of the Institution of Structural Engineers.

The Structural Engineer

Part 3: Introduction This year’s examination was attempted by a total of 779 candidates, a slight increase in comparison with last year. Of those candidates, 379 took the examination in the UK while there were 384 candidates overseas.

The Structural Engineer

Adhesive technology may not be familiar to many structural engineers as adhesives have been used mostly in the aerospace and automotive industries. In these sectors much research has been carried out on the behaviour of adhesively bonded joints.

The Structural Engineer

This paper reviews the changing use of Information Technology (IT) in the construction process and the benefits that are attainable to clients and practitioners. The introduction of integrated 3-dimensional project modelling is a key enabling technology and its potential and challenges to designers and contractors are described from their contrasting viewpoints. The factors restricting its uptake in the construction sector are examined. The conclusions are that the inhibitions to its use are founded in our construction culture. Sturat Cowperthwaite, Graham Raven and Mervyn Richards

The Structural Engineer

Following the fire on the night of 4-5 February 1994, it took two years to make the necessary decisions and organize the initial funding. Finally in August 1996, reconstruction work began on the building, which was listed as a historical monument in 1883. Much use was made of up-to-the-minute technology. The sections described in this article mark a break with the philosophy that has long prevailed for this type of project. All in all, it was an impressive operation, managed by Alain Charles Perrot, chief architect of the historical monument department.

The Structural Engineer

The Institution’s Logo Various readers have responded to the suggestions in Verulam 15 September 1998 (Vol 76 No 18). Ronald Deen from Glasgow writes: We have talk of bending moment diagrams with a lion scratching on a post or sliderules or workers in hard hats to meet with the spirit of the new millennium. Even civil engineers have their beaver and stork. How strange that engineers, supposedly the most practical and pragmatic of professions have for so long ignored the greatest builders that have ever lived. I refer to the family of Arachne - the spiders.