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The Structural Engineer

A strategy of economy with engineered aesthetics was used to develop the design basis for the AAT Air-Cargo Handling Terminal at Chek Lap Kok, Hong Kong (see Fig l). The architectural and structural teams worked closely to develop engineered solutions that would be simultaneously attractive and of low cost. This paper outlines the progression of the design from concept to final design. J.M. Morris

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The Structural Engineer

‘Almost a decade ago we decided to put together a first-class team of engineers to try to win the bid to design the Sydney Olympic stadium,’ says Ian Thompson, Director of Sinclair Knight Merz (UK) Ltd. ‘We formed a joint venture partnership with contractors Multiplex and architects HOK Lobb. But we lacked a competitive edge when it came to designing lightweight canopy structures’. Through architects HOK Lobb, Stephen Morley and his young practice in London were approached to join the consortium. Thompson had heard a lot about the young structural engineer, Stephen Morley, who was responsible for the MacAlpine stadium roof and other notable lightweight steel structures while he was with Anthony Hunt and Modus Consultants. The SKM/More1y alliance was forged during the design of the Olympic Stadium. In 1999, by mutual agreement, SKM acquired Modus Consultants for whom Morley was working, and immediately opened a London ofice to establish their European base and to look for stadium design work opportunities in the Americas. David Bennett

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The Structural Engineer

The rapid expansion in air travel is a worldwide phenomenon, and nowhere more so than in southeast Asia where passenger volume has been increasing on an unprecedented scale. The new Hong Kong Airport at Chek Lap Kok was planned to meet the growth projections for air travel into the 21st century; the project comprised not only the airport itself, but also the entire infrastructure required to service it. The total project, collectively known as the airport core programme (ACP), included the road and rail network connecting the airport to Hong Kong and Kowloon, together with the construction of a complete township at Tung Chung, adjacent to the new airport. With a value of some £15bn, the ACP stands as one of the world's largest construction endeavours; what is even more impressive is the fact that it was constructed in a remarkably short period of time. H.J. Gettins and Y. Ushio

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The Structural Engineer

Aspects of Bridges Several members have written about bridges, with particular interest in the new Millennium Bridge. First, however, something about a very much older bridge. Mr D. J. Yendall, writing from Stockton-on-Tees, has entitled his contribution ‘Rainbow bridges: missing the boat’: I must congratulate Channel 4 for its recent programme ‘Mysteries of Lost Empires’ (screened on 22 June 2000) on what was a thought-provoking and informative insight into ancient Chinese bridge-building. The concept of timber pinned arches constructed with readily available materials and labour, with straight pieces of timber, to form a simple, elegant and rapid solution to crossing busy canal networks to form an arched bridge without disruption demonstrated that the problems facing modern engineers are nothing new.

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