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The Structural Engineer

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The Structural Engineer

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Author – Stansfield, K

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The Structural Engineer

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The Structural Engineer

This paper considers the problem of human acceptance of floor vibrations induced by walking loads. It defines the parameters used in the assessment of this serviceability issue, including vibration dose values (VDVs) and the frequency weighting that should be applied to vertical vibrations. The relevant guidance given in British Standards is discussed and an example provided to illustrate the analysis procedures. The paper then considers the analysis of measurements of vibration induced by walking, examining first a range of walking frequencies and then deriving some empirical links between measured peak acceleration and VDV. To determine human reaction, VDVs need to be measured for a complete day or night. As this may not always be possible, it is necessary to consider ways of estimating daily VDVs. Therefore, the number of walking periods that should be considered during a day is examined and its influence on the estimated VDVs determined. This provides a relationship between the peak accelerations that can be measured during tests and the VDVs used to assess serviceability. The calculation of VDV is then examined, and calculated VDVs for a range of floors presented. Crowd loading is illustrated using measurements made on two floors. Although the use of VDVs does not seem to have been adopted widely, they appear to provide a sensible method for serviceability evaluation of floor vibrations. Brian R. Ellis, BSc, PhD, CEng, MIStructE Centre for Structural Engineering, BRE, Watford, UK

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Author – Ellis, Brian R

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The Structural Engineer

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Author – McDermott-Smith, Majella

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The Structural Engineer

After 50 years airships are once again being developed in Germany. The firm CargoLifter AG will use them to lift and transport goods of up to 160t over long distances. For this it has built a hangar in which to produce and maintain the first two of this new generation of CL160 helium-filled airships or ‘blimps’ – so called because they will have no rigid skeleton. No internal structure means less self-weight to lift, so they will be able to carry far more than the approximately 60t of the largest pre-War Zeppelins. The site is a former Soviet airfield in Brand, some 50km south of Berlin, and the whole project comprises the hangar itself, several other buildings for component production, plus a visitors’ centre. The masterplan was developed by architects SIAT Architektur + Technik, Munich, who co-ordinated the planning and were supported at an early stage by a design team, including Arup as structural engineer. Though it is an ‘industrial building’, the architecture of the CargoLifter hangar is of considerable importance, both functionally and visually, due to its size and impact. M. M. Janner, MSc, EurIng Associate, Arup R. Lutz, Dipl-Ing Managing Director, Arup GmbH P. Moerland, Ir, Dr-Ing Senior Structural Engineer, Arup T. Simmonds, BSc

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Author – Janner, M M;[et al]

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The Structural Engineer

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Author – N/A

Price – £9