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The Structural Engineer

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The Structural Engineer

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The Structural Engineer

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The Structural Engineer

This paper describes a pavilion structure designed as part of a project to promote innovation in residential development in Hong Kong. The pavilion exhibited two apartment ‘building blocks’ or modules intended for use in the sustainable construction of multi-storey residential towers. The INTEGER organisation was commissioned to design an exhibition which would not only demonstrate sustainability but would also explain how new ideas could be used to raise the quality of the built environment. The INTEGER team decided that it was important to design and construct the pavilion itself using sustainability principles. The paper explains how this was achieved and how it took into account local conditions and local skills. The background to the project and the exhibition concept together with the engineering design concepts which were adopted in the design of the pavilion are also described. The end result was a dramatic addition to the Hong Kong Island waterfront at Tamar comprising a comprehensive multi-media exhibition and two apartments known as ‘flats of the future’. R. E. Slade, BSc, CEng, FIStructE WSP Cantor Seinuk, London R. Stephens, BEng, CEng, MIStructE Formerly of WSP Group, Hong Kong

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The Structural Engineer

To ease some of the worst urban traffic congestion in the USA, the Central Artery Project (C/AT) in Boston, Massachusetts, involves relocating much of the city’s main highway network underground. Known locally as the ‘Big Dig’, it is a landmark project in urban infrastructure redevelopment1,2. It is scheduled for full completion in 2005 but with many of the new sections now operational it is already revitalising the city and establishing a more sustainable future for its citizens. It was essential to minimise disruption during construction and the alternative of tunnel jacking provided a key solution to this need. The jacked tunnels comprise by far the largest, most complex project of this type in the world, with each box structure well over 10 times the size of any jacked tunnels previously attempted in the USA. Introducing a wide range of innovation, the tunnel jacking has delivered a low maintenance, robust construction while adding important environmental advantages and contributed to over US$300m in construction savings3. From concept to completion of the tunnel jacking in 2001, required over a decade of sustained development and close teamwork. The official opening of the section of interstate highway section that includes the jacked tunnels was celebrated on 17 January 2003. This paper provides an overview of the tunnel jacking and focuses on the key structural aspects and the innovations involved. Alan Powderham, FREng, FICE, MIStructE Mott MacDonald Steve Taylor, MICE, MIStructE, PE (Structural) Hatch Mott MacDonald Derek Winsor, MICE, MIStructE, PE (Structural) Mott MacDonald

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The Structural Engineer

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The Structural Engineer

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