External timber cladding: design and performance

Author: I. P. Davies (Edinburgh Napier University), C. A. Fairfield (Edinburgh Napier University), A. Stupart (Edinburgh Napier University), J. Wood (Edinburgh Napier University)

Date published

30 November 2012

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
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External timber cladding: design and performance

External timber cladding: design and performance
The Structural Engineer
Author

I. P. Davies (Edinburgh Napier University), C. A. Fairfield (Edinburgh Napier University), A. Stupart (Edinburgh Napier University), J. Wood (Edinburgh Napier University)

Date published

30 November 2012

Author

I. P. Davies (Edinburgh Napier University), C. A. Fairfield (Edinburgh Napier University), A. Stupart (Edinburgh Napier University), J. Wood (Edinburgh Napier University)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Exposure trials on timber cladding are valuable sources of information for façade designers. Key material, fire, and structural issues affecting timber cladding design are assessed and robust construction details derived alongside a framework for the emerging sub-discipline of timber façade engineering. The timber used was UK grown Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis).

The work was undertaken because timber is an increasingly common cladding material in the UK, being used on low-rise residential buildings and for medium-rise and non-domestic buildings. The associated risks have, therefore, increased but this is not reflected in published guidance.

Around 40 construction details were produced and a selection are shown in this paper. They integrate, for the first time, all of the performance requirements applicable to low- and medium-rise timber façades in the UK. The work’s key benefit is that the guidance arising from this study rationalises and improves façade design.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
8
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 12

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