Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 12): Introduction to steel portal frames

Author: The Institution of Structural Engineers

Date published

29 May 2014

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Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 12): Introduction to steel portal frames

The Structural Engineer
Technical Guidance Note (Level 2, No. 12): Introduction to steel portal frames
Date published

29 May 2014

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers

Portal frames are a simple and very common type of framed (or skeleton) structure. Steel portal frames, in
particular, are a cost-effective structural system to support building envelopes (such as warehouses and
shopping complexes) requiring large column-free spaces. In general, the loads and consequent deformations
for these frames are in the plane of the structure, and hence these are a 2D (or plane) frame structure. Due to
the practical requirement of having a clear space between the supports of a portal frame, providing in-plane
bracing is generally not feasible. Consequently, these frames undergo larger deflections and are prone to
sway laterally, even under the vertical loads. The concept of sway frames is addressed in more detail in Technical
Guidance Note No. 10 (Level 1) Principles of lateral stability. Thus, in spite of the inherent simplicity of portal frames, many aspects of their analysis, design and detailing require careful consideration.


Portal frames can be made from concrete, timber and even glass but the vast majority, in the UK certainly, are constructed from steel. This Technical Guidance Note gives an introduction to steel portal frames and their preliminary analysis. Steel portal frames usually have pinned bases and moment connections at the column/rafter interface and mid-span apex splice in the rafter. Although there are other forms of portal frame (described in Elastic Design of Single- Span Steel Portal Frame Buildings to Eurocode 3), for the sake of brevity and clarity this note will be dedicated to this particular form.



(This article was updated in October 2016 to reflect errata issued since its original publication.)

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
5
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Technical Guidance Notes Technical Guidance Notes (Level 2) Technical Guidance Notes Technical Issue 6

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