Managing Health and Safety Risks (No. 29): Industrial rope access

Author: The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Date published

1 July 2014

Price

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Members/Subscribers: Free

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Managing Health and Safety Risks (No. 29): Industrial rope access

The Structural Engineer
Managing Health and Safety Risks (No. 29): Industrial rope access
Date published

1 July 2014

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

The Institution's Health and Safety Panel set out the measures that should be taken in order for engineers to work safely at height in this manner.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
2
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Managing Health & Safety Risks Professional Guidance Issue 7

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