The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 94 (2016) > Issue 1 > Conservation compendium. Part 14: Dunston Staiths, Gateshead – a case study in timber conservation a
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Conservation compendium. Part 14: Dunston Staiths, Gateshead – a case study in timber conservation and repair

The previous article in the Conservation compendium provided an introduction to common repairs and strengthening of structural timbers in historic buildings. This article continues by illustrating how structural timber fared at the Grade II listed Dunston Staiths in northeast England.

The River Tyne has been a major discharge port for coal from the UK’s Northumberland and Durham coalfields for centuries. Staiths were constructed near the mouths of navigable rivers as a means of discharging coal from railway wagons into ships, and the Dunston Staiths were the largest timber structure in Europe at the end of the 19th century. Their repair history has been reasonably well documented and so they provide a good case study for timber deterioration, selection of repair species and strength analysis.

Author(s): C. Blackett-Ord (CARE + Blackett-Ord Conservation Limited)