Conservation compendium. Epilogue: The future of conservation engineering

Author: J. Miller (CTP Consulting Engineers)

Date published

1 June 2016

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Conservation compendium. Epilogue: The future of conservation engineering

The Structural Engineer
Author

J. Miller (CTP Consulting Engineers)

Date published

1 June 2016

Author

J. Miller (CTP Consulting Engineers)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

James Miller brings this series to a close by looking back over ground covered and forward to a bright future in which conservation accreditation is increasingly valued and engineers are able to innovate through the application of emerging technologies.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
2
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Conservation compendium Issue 6

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