Temporary Works Toolkit. Part 8: Use of modular hydraulic propping systems for the temporary support

Author: T. Gould (Vp plc Groundforce Shorco)

Date published

1 February 2017

First published: 1 February 2017

Price

Free

Access Resource

Added to basket

Back to Previous

Temporary Works Toolkit. Part 8: Use of modular hydraulic propping systems for the temporary support

The Structural Engineer
Temporary Works Toolkit. Part 8: Use of modular hydraulic propping systems for the temporary support
Date published

1 February 2017

First published

1 February 2017

Author

T. Gould (Vp plc Groundforce Shorco)

Price

Free

Access Resource

Temporary works design is often perceived as the poor relation to permanent works design with, by definition, little or no evidence of its presence in the completed project. However, well-designed and, of course, well-executed temporary works solutions can lead to big cost savings, while providing a safe and efficient environment for the permanent works to be built. This is particularly the case with below-ground temporary works, where there are a great many challenges to be faced by a temporary works designer, who is often working right ‘at the end of the food chain’ of information flow. Soil mechanics, whether it is for a shallow trench or a deep basement, is an inexact science at best, relying heavily on engineering judgment to provide a safe, economic and practical solution.

Nowadays in the UK, the majority of below-ground temporary works support is undertaken using proprietary equipment, provided on a rental basis by specialist suppliers. Over the last 30 years, the scope of proprietary equipment has increased dramatically. In the 1980s, proprietary equipment was limited to shoring up pipe trenches and small-scale pits, which were supported with hydraulically operated aluminium waler frames or the ubiquitous manhole brace. Today, there is a huge range of equipment available to support all sizes of trench, shaft and coff erdam. It is not uncommon to see modular hydraulic struts clear-spanning over 40m.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
3
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Temporary Works Toolkit Technical Issue 2

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
Temporary Works Toolkit. Part 7: Temporary works failures – what can we learn?

Temporary Works Toolkit. Part 7: Temporary works failures – what can we learn?

In the second of two articles examining temporary works failures, Director of Structural-Safety, Alastair Soane, considers why failures occur and what steps can be taken to reduce the risk of catastrophic events.

Date - 1 February 2017
Author - A. Soane
Price - Free
The Structural Engineer
Buckling matters – rotational spring supports (a simple method for buckling analysis)

Buckling matters – rotational spring supports (a simple method for buckling analysis)

The majestic splendour of the Millau Viaduct, towering 343m above the Tarn valley in southern France, will inspire engineers for generations to come. Emulating such feats of engineering requires an understanding of buckling beyond the simple Euler formulae for pin-ended struts, as well as the services of a celebrated architect to fine-tune the proportions and sculpt the shape and details of the extraordinary pier supports.

Exceptionally tall or slender columns may necessitate finite-element (FE) modelling to determine the effects of buckling. However, in many cases, an accurate assessment of the critical buckling load can be made by hand calculations incorporating spring supports or tapered/stepped stiffness columns. This paper discusses the calculation of the buckling load for the end conditions given in Eurocode 2 (EC2), Figure 5.7, including various rotational spring restraints and variable stiffness within the length of the strut.

Date - 1 February 2017
Author - A. Robertson
Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
Temporary Works Toolkit. Part 19: An introduction to the demolition of large stuctures

Temporary Works Toolkit. Part 19: An introduction to the demolition of large stuctures

This article provides a brief introduction to demolition practice in the UK, addressing the more technical aspects requiring engineering input.

Date - 1 August 2018
Author - A. Holdsworth (Andun)
Price - Free