On a Method for the Direct Design of Framed Structures Having Redundant Bracing

Author: Pippard, A J Sutton

Date published

1st May 1923

First published: 1st May 1923

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On a Method for the Direct Design of Framed Structures Having Redundant Bracing

The Structural Engineer
On a Method for the Direct Design of Framed Structures Having Redundant Bracing
Date published

1st May 1923

First published

1st May 1923

Author

Pippard, A J Sutton

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

l. From the standpoint of purely theoretical design all the members in a framed structure should be made of such dimensions that their material will be stressed to the allowable limit under the external load system considered, since a structure proportioned in this way will ensure maximum economy in the use of material. In many cases such an ideal structure may be impracticable, and will have to be modified to meet a variety of conditions imposed byconsiderations other than those of theoretical design. Whatever modifications are necessary, however, to meet such conditions the ideal design will have considerable value as a basis for the development of the final scheme embodying the requirements of practical engineering. In some cases, e.g., in the design of all aircraft structures, the reduction of weight is such an important consideration that very little is permitted to stand in the way of its attainment, and in such cases this ideal structure would be very closely followed. Professor A.J. Sutton Pippard

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Volume 1 (1923) Issue 5

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