Correpondence on Concrete Roads
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Correpondence on Concrete Roads

The Structural Engineer
Correpondence on Concrete Roads
Date published

N/A

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Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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A reply to J. Singleton-Green, Esq., B.SC., A.M.I.Struct.E. Sir,-If the discussion in your paper upon Concrete Roads is to be continued for the benefit of those really interested in this important branch of engineering it appears necessary to focus it upon those lines which lead to useful information.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Opinion Issue 9

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