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The Structural Engineer
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N/A

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Members/Subscribers: Free

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Within the preceding pages we have traced the history of the Institution from its beginning as the Concrete Institute to the present day. We have shown how the membership of the Institution has grown from a small body of men to one of over eight thousand engineers drawn from all quarters of the globe, how its activities have expanded from the relatively restricted field of concrete to cover all types of structures in all the materials of construction and how, step by step, national and international recognition has been given to the exclusive title of “ Chartered Structural Engineer ” which our Members and Associate-Members are proud to bear.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Opinion Issue 13

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The Structural Engineer
The Branches

The Branches

The Lancashire and Cheshire Branch ON THE 25 November 1922, some forty local members of the Institution of Structural Engineers gathered in the Lecture Hall of the Victoria University, Manchester, to meet the President, the late Mr. E. Fiander Etchells, and to consider the formation of a Branch. A petition to this effect was drawn up and signed by sixteen members and on the 14 December the petition was granted by the Council.

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The Structural Engineer
Design of Steel Frames for Buildings

Design of Steel Frames for Buildings

STRUCTURAL STEELWORK was little used in this before the year 1900. At that time the general country practice was to construct a load-bearing shell of self supporting brickwork with some steelwork used internally and also externally at first floor level where large shop window openings were required. Floors were mainly of timber, or of filler joist construction for fire resistance. Stanchions were almost invariably made in single storey lengths, with caps and bases, either of steel I-section or of cast iron in which case the section was usually circular. These columns were simply placed one on top of the other with perhaps a few bolts joining them together. Frequently the beams were continuous over the stanchion caps and thus the load from the pillar above had to be transmitted by the web of the beam to the pillar below. Holding down bolts and stanchion splice plates were practically unknown. The resulting structure approximated very closely to what is assumed in the orthodox method of design in general use today. That is, in effect, that the beams rested on simple supports and the stanchions were made up of individual single storey lengths without any attempt at continuity. The stanchions could hardly be described as pin-ended but they were very much nearer to that ideal than those found in a modern structure. Professor J.F. Baker

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The Structural Engineer
Composite Construction

Composite Construction

IT is a curious point that the study of composite action in structures should appear to be one of the most modern of research subjects, for the best of designers have from ancient times been accustomed to look upon the structure as a whole. Bridge builders in particular, and medieval craftsmen in masonry structures, made good use of structural continuity. The advent of cast iron, and later of steel, has led to a specialization and a degree of precision in the analysis of frames that has become by now somewhat fictitious, unless of course the frame really is a bare frame. This over-concentration on frame analysis has led to a neglect of the study of the whole structure. R.H. Wood

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