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The Structural Engineer

All articles published in the April 2012 issue.

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – N/A

Price – £25

The Structural Engineer

The recently completed New Engineering Building (NEB) at the National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) is a new state of the art academic facility on the university’s north campus. The building unites all five engineering disciplines within the university and at 14,250m² is now the largest engineering school in Ireland. It represents a milestone in the construction of engineering educational facilities by incorporating the use of numerous types of sensors to create an interactive learning environment for engineering students. Not only will it be a centre of education, but the building itself will act as a ‘living laboratory’ and teaching tool. This paper outlines the instrumentation of the structural elements within the building and the part they will play in the teaching and understanding of structural engineering within the university.

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – J. Goggins, D. Byrne and E. Cannon (College of Engineering and Informatics, National University of Ireland, Galway)

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

The Drapers’ Gardens redevelopment, completed in 2011, involved the construction of an office building in the Bank Conservation Area within the City of London. The confined city site and the ground conditions presented a number of challenges. The site activities commenced with the demolition of the existing 100m high tower structure. At the time it was the tallest office structure to be demolished in the UK. The perimeter support of the substructure was designed to minimise internal propping. The piled foundations re-used a substantial number from the existing piled raft. Archaeological investigations uncovered an extensive area of preserved Roman development and water channels. The building obtained an excellent BREEAM rating which influenced the services and façade design. This led to demands on the structural design. The steel framed structure above ground is a distinctive stepped form rising to 15 storeys with spans up to 15m to satisfy the developer’s desire for column-free spaces. The staircases on the south façade are a visible feature. Close working within the multi-disciplinary design team and with the main contractor ensured this complex project was efficiently completed.

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – I.R. Blunn, K.J.F. Grady and H.A. Taylor (Foggo Associates)

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

The Law Both criminal and civil law is relevant to the management of health and safety risks. The criminal law i.e. that made in Parliament (and much of which originates from the EU) is relevant to all workplaces and work related activities, but is specifically relevant because of the significant risks arising from construction activities.

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Why report to CROSS? Alastair Soane, Director of Structural-Safety.org urges more engineers to engage with the programme, dispelling some reporting myths and highlighting the community-wide benefits of submitting concerns.

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – A.Soane

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

This Technical Guidance Note concerns lateral loads that are applied to barriers and wheel axle loads from vehicles. Barrier loading is dealt with slightly differently to other forms of imposed loading. The nature of the loading can vary from people leaning against barriers to vehicles colliding with them at speed. Axle loading from vehicles has to be treated somewhat differently to other forms of imposed loading. While it is possible to assume a blanket area load to represent them, it is the point load from each wheel that needs closer attention.

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – The Institution of Structural Engineers

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

There has been recent increased use of earth for construction of buildings in developed countries, largely because of concerns with the environmental impact and embodied carbon from fired bricks and cement-based products. Of all forms of earth construction, the widest impact on modern construction is likely to come from commercially produced unfired earth masonry where large-scale production can significantly reduce costs. While there are benefits to using earth masonry, structural design with earth masonry raises some specific issues that are not necessarily relevant to other forms of masonry construction. This paper summarises these issues and presents results of extensive structural testing on modern earth masonry. The structural properties required for design are compared with typical values for other masonry types in Eurocode 6, showing that commercially produced earth masonry can meet or even exceed the structural capacity of other commonly used masonry systems.

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – A. Heath, D. Maskell, P. Walker, M. Lawrence and C. Fourie (BRE Centre for Innovative Construction Materials, Department of Architecture and Civil Engineering, University of Bath, UK)

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Kevin Lea, BIM Business Development Manager at CSC, provides a personal view on what BIM really means to the structural engineer and whether Structural BIM is being used to its full potential.

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – K. Lea (CSC)

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

A 3rd edition of Gimsing and Georgakis book was released in January 2012. Buro Happold’s Davood Liaghat takes a look…

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – D. Liaghat (Buro Happold)

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Topics of importance openly discussed...

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – Various

Price – £9

The Structural Engineer

Covering a vast geographical area hasn't prevented the Caribbean group from working towards common goals...

Publish Date - 1st April 2012

Author – Various

Price – £9