Conservation compendium. Part 5: Inspection and repair of cantilever stone staircases

Author: C. Richardson (AECOM and CARE)

Date published

1 April 2015

Price

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Conservation compendium. Part 5: Inspection and repair of cantilever stone staircases

Conservation compendium. Part 5: Inspection and repair of cantilever stone staircases
The Structural Engineer
Author

C. Richardson (AECOM and CARE)

Date published

1 April 2015

Author

C. Richardson (AECOM and CARE)

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Cantilever stone staircases have been used in all sorts of buildings for more than 350 years.
Unfortunately, when surveying buildings we can be so intent on getting from floor
to floor that we forget to look at the stairs on the way. Like all structures, stairs need regular inspection and maintenance; without which, collapses can ultimately occur.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
3
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Conservation compendium Technical Issue 4

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